Strada Statale 163 and one crazy Amalfi ride

Ingredients are the same as in so many other parts of the world: there is sea, sun, mild weather, small coastal towns and villages, beaches and lovely vegetation. What makes Costiera Amalfitana stand out as one of the most memorable places I have ever seen, though, is the road – crazy Strada Statale 163 Amalfitana that connects towns situated along the Amalfi coast, starting with Meta and ending with Vietri sul Mare. It follows the coast for some 50 kilometers and, on its way, twists into more than 1 500 bends. Continue reading “Strada Statale 163 and one crazy Amalfi ride”

Torna a Surriento

It is not easy to define what is it about Sorrento that reminds you so vividly of the old glitzy European resorts of the first half of the 20th century. Maybe it’s the Mediterranean architecture of luxurious old hotels, or its small streets and hidden squares, or the fact that Piazza Tasso, the town’s central square, turns into a pedestrian area in the evening – the crazy traffic gets shut down and tourists stroll around, merrily and nonchalantly, enjoying a gelato or a late drink in one of the cafés surrounding the square. Add to the picture palm trees and fragrant flowers, romantic gold illumination of the street lamps and views of the sea… and you feel like you have walked into a set of an old Hollywood movie.

Piazza Tasso, an international placeRomantic evening in the town centre

Although the first impression is that of a classic, classy Italian resort, Sorrento on a second glance turns into a strange little town where unexpected sights lurk at every corner.

Blue skies and palm trees everywhere

For example, as you approach Piazza Tasso, what might slightly surprise you is the deep, steep valley filled with shrubbery in the middle of the area that is otherwise filled with palatial, beautifully lit hotels and buildings. What at first seems like a strange example of neglecting in an otherwise lovely and up kept town centre, turns out to be, as the quick look into your guide book will probably show you, a deep crack in the rock created during a huge eruption that happened 35 000 years ago. Today, this area is known as Valle dei Mulini (Valley of the Mills), taking its name from the largest of several abandoned brick mills that were built at the beginning of the 20th century at the bottom of the valley in order to take advantage of the constant stream of water located there.  

Valle dei Mulini_2Valle dei mulini_ mill ruins

Peeking down the gigantic crack and seeing the surreal ruins of buildings reminds you of the fact that the Sorrento peninsula – and the entire area surrounding the Gulf of Naples – is a fascinating geological area full of examples of Mother Earth’s power, wonder, quirkiness and fickleness.

Another thing that shows you that Sorrento is not a typical seaside town, but a strange place situated in fascinating natural surroundings is its location – perched at the very edge of a high cliff, on a massive stone formation looking as if it was cut off, in clear, straight cuts, from a block of stone that no longer exists.

High upIf you want to come to Piazza Tasso from Marina Piccola, Sorrento’s little harbor that serves as a sea link with other parts of the peninsula and Italy in general, due to the very impressive elevation difference, you can either choose to take the long, curvaceous, somewhat steep road and marvel the town’s layers of architecture and views of the sea, or climb the steep steps carved directly into the cliff and test your physical fitness to the very limits.

Curvy road from Marina PiccolaMarina Piccola

Once you discover Sorrento’s peculiarities and conclude that the town would be a perfect setting for one of Agatha Christie’s crime novels due to the just right amount of grittiness behind the glitz and the poshness of the town, you can relax and start exploring Sorrento’s narrow side streets full of restaurants and tiny shops.

Narrow streets bustling with lifeHere comes the sun...

The leitmotif of your walk will surely be color yellow. It is everywhere and in everything: in bottles of limoncello, soaps and souvenirs, biscuits, candy and in or on every other imaginable sellable item. Before you succumb to the urge to have everything that Sorrento’s sellers have to offer, because the color yellow never seemed so bright and inviting before, and the smell of lemon that you can’t escape gets soaked up into your clothes, you will be offered, almost in every shop, different lemony treats – lemon liquors and creams, biscuits, hard and soft candy and chocolate.

Sorrento souvenirsAnd it was all yellow...A taste of Sorrento

If you get overwhelmed with lemon-themed shops, there are other popular souvenirs that will remind you of Sorrento, such as pepperoncini and other fragrant condiments, maiolica pottery and inlay wood objects. They all add to the festival of fragrances, colors and details that you simply cannot avoid to experience with all your senses. 

PepperonciniColorful Sorrento souvenirs

If experienced in too high doses, even delight can be a bit tiring. So once you fulfill your lemony desires and collect all necessary and not-so-necessary reminders of Sorrento, the best thing is to have a drink at one of the many terraces on Piazza Tasso, enjoy the atmosphere of the town and listen to wonderful, romantic canzone Italiane played by street musicians.

Small town lifeBecause what else do you need to live the lifestyle of  Italian Dolce vita?

Beautiful views everywhere

The Due Terre

Monterosso al Mare, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola and Riomaggiore are five colorful fishing villages on the coast of Liguria that have become a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1997. Dramatically situated between the sea and the land, they can be reached by walking paths, trains and boats, but not by cars. Not that that poses a problem for the rivers of tourists that flock them every year. Continue reading “The Due Terre”

I found my love in Portofino, and my joy in Santa Margherita Ligure

Driving in Italy is not for the faint-hearted. Driving down Strada Stradale 227, the road that connects Portofino with Santa Margherita Ligure and other parts of Liguria, might just be the most tense, Bond-like drive you will ever take in your life. Continue reading “I found my love in Portofino, and my joy in Santa Margherita Ligure”

„La Superba“, Pt. 2: Falling In Love with Mediterranean Ports and Palm Trees

I read in my guide that Genova’s Porto Antico (the Old Port) was a dark, seedy place before it was genially revamped by the local boy turned world famous architect, Renzo Piano in 1992, just in time to celebrate the anniversary of Columbus’ discovery of the New World. Seeing the area for the first time this summer, I couldn’t imagine that there was time when walking around the port was a dangerous endeavor. On the contrary: for me, the city port was the experience that made me fall hopelessly in love with Genova, its sun, its sea, the light breeze and palms… Continue reading “„La Superba“, Pt. 2: Falling In Love with Mediterranean Ports and Palm Trees”